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HRC31: Denmark joins statement of Geneva Group of Friends of the Responsibility to Protect in dialogue with Mr. Adama Dieng, Special Adviser to Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide.

HRC31: Denmark joins statement of Geneva Group of Friends of the Responsibility to Protect in dialogue with Mr. Adama Dieng, Special Adviser to Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide.

03.03.2016 


Statement by the Group of Friends  of the Responsibility to Protect in Geneva at the Informal Interactive Dialogue with Under-Secretary-General Mr. Adama Dieng, Special Adviser to Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide, 3 March 2016
I have the honour of delivering this statement on behalf of the Group of Friends of the Responsibility to Protect, which is co-chaired by the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Republic of Rwanda.

The Group of Friends in Geneva was formally established in November 2015 on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the 2005 World Summit, recognizing the crucial role that Geneva-based organizations play in highlighting the importance of preventing mass atrocity crimes through capacity building and early warning. The Membership of the Group of Friends mirrors that of the equivalent Group in New York and includes over fifty delegations from every region of the world.


The Group of Friends would like to thank Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide, Mr. Adama Dieng, for his presentation on the activities of his office.

The adoption of the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document, which recognized the Responsibility to Protect, reflected a historic commitment by the United Nations and its Member States regarding the protection of populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. The Group of Friends reaffirms its enduring and collective commitment to RtoP as reflected in paragraphs 138 and 139 of the World Summit Outcome Document.

We take this opportunity to reaffirm our full support to the work of the Joint Office of the Special Advisers on the Prevention of Genocide and on the Responsibility to Protect. The Special Advisers can and do act in an early warning capacity by drawing attention to situations that could result in genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and ethnic cleansing, therefore contributing to preventive efforts. We also encourage the Special Advisers to continue their efforts to mainstream the Responsibility to Protect in the United Nations system, including through enhanced cooperation with the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms.

We would like to highlight the Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes of the Office of the Special Advisers, which can be a useful guide for assessing the risk of atrocity crimes, including genocide, and could serve as an important tool for mainstreaming atrocity prevention in the United Nations. The Framework can also be useful in assisting regional mechanisms and States to strengthen their respective regional and national capacities and strategies.

Furthermore the Group of Friends encourages States to highlight their domestic efforts to address risks associated with atrocity crimes in relevant human rights mechanisms.


The Group of Friends further notes with appreciation the Secretary General’s intent to develop a preventive approach that would focus on averting large scale violations and abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law, which could amount to genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and/or crimes against humanity.

On the occasion of this dialogue, the Group of Friends would like to emphasize the importance of the full and effective implementation of the Responsibility to Protect. We recommit ourselves to the protection of populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity, and encourage all member states to do the same.

Mr. Dieng, the Group of Friends of the Responsibility to Protect in Geneva looks forward to cooperating with you and would be grateful for your suggestions on how to further mainstream RtoP in Geneva.


 1. Netherlands, Rwanda, Botswana, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Tanzania, Banglandesh, Japan, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Uruguay, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Czech Republic, Denmark, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Liechenstein, Luxembourg, Norway, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, United States